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Presidential Candidates Answer Questions Posed By Indian American Community

Press Release - India Association of New Hampshire
01/14/2004

New Hampshire has the unique distinction of holding the first-in-the-Nation Presidential Primary. This status gives the residents of New Hampshire including the Indian American community special access to the candidates for Republican and Democratic nominations for President. In this context, the Public Relations Committee of the India Association of New Hampshire formulated a questionnaire and sent it to all the major Democratic candidates. We received responses from five candidates: Gen. Clark, Gov. Dean, Sen. Kerry, Rep. Kucinich, and Sen. Lieberman. The responses are reproduced verbatim organized by questions.

Question 1: There has been growing defense cooperation between the US and India. In recent years, it has taken the form of joint exercises, exchanges, lifting of import restrictions, etc. As President, would you support continuing this cooperation?

Gen. Clark:
As President, I will continue to strengthen our relationship with India by encouraging trade and bilateral communication. We are part of a global community, in which trade and jobs are shared by many nations. We need to encourage a global market and free and fair trade. The influx of merchandise, ideas and cultures makes this country vibrant and strong. I support an open global trade system, but believe we need to make sure that all nations play by the rules so that trade does not lead to a race to the bottom, undermining protections for labor and the environment. I will encourage India and all people of conscience, to work together to ensure global security. This is a task America cannot accomplish by itself, and I will welcome all alliances to promote a safer world. It is crucial to work together create a partnership with the global community.

Gov. Dean:
Yes, I would. As President, I will strengthen America’s security and economic relationship with India in order to build regional security throughout Asia. I support the enhanced defense cooperation and engagement that has developed between India and the U.S. in recent years. I will continue to support ongoing efforts designed to normalize US-Indian defense relations against the backdrop of our broad and mutual security goals. India is also an important trading partner for the United States and has exhibited impressive economic dynamism in recent years. I support strong, enforceable trade agreements with India and will negotiate trade agreements that lead to a trade system bound by clear, continually improving rules. This means including common sense labor and environmental standards, which are necessary for a sustainable, mutually beneficial trade relationship that avoids both protectionism and destructive trade disputes. Trade should lead to improved standards of living for all Americans and also for our trading partners.

Sen. Kerry:
I have long supported a closer relationship between the United States and India -- democracies that share many ideals, and face common challenges. I believe it is important that the relationship between our two countries continue to grow in every aspect, including defense. As President, I will continue the combined naval and special forces exercises our governments have undertaken. The threat of international terrorism affects both the United States and India. And the fight against terrorism requires a mix of military, diplomatic and law enforcement responses. I strongly believe that the United States and India must continue to work together to bolster our joint capacities.

Rep. Kucinich:
Yes. I believe that maintaining strong ties with India are important for America. This should include bilateral trade agreements, student exchange programs, and defense cooperation. As president, I would embrace India as a valued ally. Furthermore, I think that India will become a more prominent voice in the United Nations over the next few decades.

Sen. Lieberman:
Yes. Both nations currently confront a serious threat from terrorism. America’s own experience as the target of terrorism enables us to truly appreciate the difficulty India confronts in battling terrorists in Kashmir, and – as the attack on India’s Parliament demonstrated – even in India itself. As President, I will work to create a special strategic relationship between the United States and India, including military-to-military exchanges that I hope will deepen into a strong bilateral defense relationship. I will institute regular meetings with the Indian Prime Minister – one of my first foreign trips would be to India to establish this dialogue – and I will ensure that there are regular meetings between our defense ministers and chiefs of military services.

Question 2: As President, how would you balance the need of the American corporations to remain competitive by outsourcing back-office operations to countries like India with the concern of the American people with job losses at home?

Gen. Clark:
My highest priority is creating good jobs in America. I have proposed a detailed manufacturing and technology policy that would stop rewarding companies that move jobs overseas and start rewarding companies that create jobs in America. But at the same time, the world’s economy is dynamic and we need to invest in the knowledge and skills so that American workers can compete in the high-wage, high-tech jobs of the future. In this way we can create policies that are win-win for America and for India.

Gov. Dean:
No response

Sen. Kerry:
I believe we must fight outsourcing and work to protect American jobs. I’ll end giveaways to companies that ship jobs overseas and I will fight to bring back the 3 millions jobs lost under George Bush.

Rep. Kucinich:
The global trade regime of NAFTA and WTO has enriched multinational corporations. But for workers, family farmers, and the environment, it has meant a global race to the bottom. Companies leave the U.S. in search of low wages, low commodity prices, anti-union climates, and lax environmental laws. NAFTA has been used to whipsaw workers at the negotiation table, forcing wages and benefit concessions under threat of moving jobs overseas. Among the first actions of a Kucinich Administration will be withdrawal from NAFTA and the WTO—to be replaced by fair trade agreements. Trade treaties must be conditioned on workers’ rights, human rights, and environmental principles. I believe that this will create a stable global economy which will greatly enlarge the middle class. Corporations have everything to gain by encouraging this sort of growth – a prosperous middle class is a necessary condition for a strong economy.

Sen. Lieberman:
The movement of jobs overseas is one of many serious challenges facing America’s economy under George W. Bush. More than 3 million people have lost their jobs under the President’s watch – 2.4 million alone in the manufacturing sector. Businesses have stopped investing, the once explosive IPO market is dormant, and the seemingly endless supply of high-tech breakthroughs has seemingly dried up. Nine million Americans are looking for work and can’t find it. And nearly three million people have fallen out of the middle class and into poverty.
As President, I will create 10 million jobs in 4 years and make the United States the world leader in manufacturing again. Here’s how I plan to do it:
· One, by cutting taxes for 98 percent of all taxpayers and demanding fairness from corporations and the well-off. I’m not just arguing about whether to keep or get rid of the Bush tax cuts. I’m taking a fresh look at the whole system—and making it work better for everybody.
· Two, by bringing down the debt. My plan will reduce the deficit every year—and balance the budget by the end of my second term.
· Three, by opening markets. Trade creates jobs. President Clinton proved that—I’ll build on his success, not build walls around our economy.
· Four, by reversing the Bush manufacturing recession. We need an aggressive strategy to stop the hemorrhaging of jobs and crack down on trade abuses by China and others. I’ll provide a 10% tax credit for manufacturers who keep jobs here in America. I’ll create a new grant program for worker training and provide Tool for Tomorrow Scholarships to existing and dislocated workers. I’ll create an R&D program for finding efficient new manufacturing processes that benefit overall industry areas. And my plan will create 21st century systems that today’s manufacturers need—high-speed broadband and environmentally friendly infrastructure.
· Five, by investing in innovation. I’ll eliminate the capital gains taxes for new investments in start-ups and provide a 20% tax credit for firms to acquire information technology. The broadband Internet, nanotechnology—these are the explosive new fields that can produce the high-paying jobs of the future for all our people.

As President, I will give the American people and the American Dream a fresh start –leading with integrity, bold ideas, and a real understanding of the hopes and fears of the shrinking middle class. I’ll be a pro-growth President—focused on spurring innovation, investing in education and training, and getting our business hiring and firing on all cylinders again. And that’s the best way to bring back prosperity and expand opportunities for all Americans.

Question 3: In your opinion, what role should US play in resolving the India-Pakistan dispute on Kashmir? As President, would you put pressure on Pakistan to stop cross-border terrorism in Kashmir?

Gen. Clark:
India makes many important contributions to the international system, but it is important that India sign and ratify the treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). India and Pakistan must devote more energy to creating a stable region, particularly as it relates to avoiding a nuclear-armed conflict. My record shows that I have been successful at bringing opposing communities together, and I will encourage dialogue between the two countries in order to advance peaceful negotiations.

Gov. Dean:
I believe the U.S. should actively seek to prevent conflict between India and Pakistan by promoting understanding and fostering joint efforts towards cooperation between the neighbors. As President, I will work with Pakistan to clamp down on militant infiltration into Kashmir and will seek to move President Musharraf toward domestic and civil reform in Pakistan as an integral component of long-term stability in the region.

Sen. Kerry:
Bi-lateral engagement between India and Pakistan is important to resolving the dispute in Kashmir, and to combating terrorism. I believe the United States has the unique ability to help this process along, and as President I intend to take full advantage of the opportunity to do so.
Pakistan’s support is important to operations in Afghanistan. Yet it is my hope that Pakistan will always remember that our goal is to have free nations with open societies in which there is no place for terror or the support of terror. Pakistan has much to gain from internal reform, and I stand eager to foster and support this process.

Rep. Kucinich:
I support the peaceful resolution of the Kashmir crisis through United Nations resolutions. Peace will flow from a resolution made in accordance with the will of the people of Kashmir. The United States should also be directly involved as a mediator in the negotiations between India and Pakistan. International monitors along the line of cease fire will help to curb cross-border terrorism. I consider the Kashmir crisis to be a top priority foreign policy issue, and as president I will work both through the United Nations and with India and Pakistan to achieve a peaceful settlement.

Sen. Lieberman:
No one can dispute that Pakistan has proven to be helpful to the U.S. in the war on terrorism, particularly in the war on Al Qaida. However, I am deeply concerned about Pakistan’s continued support of terrorist activities in Kashmir, and one of my top priorities would be to bring it to an end. There can be no military solution to Kashmir — Kashmiri militants will never succeed in driving India from Kashmir through terrorism. The only way to resolve this issue is through peaceful dialogue. As President, I would make very clear that the future of US-Pakistani relations depends on living up to the promise that President Musharraf made to the world – and to me personally – to stop all support to terrorists. I would tell Pakistan that it must step up its efforts to crack down on Islamic militants who have attacked India – and that, if President Musharraf does not take such action, I would not hesitate to add more of these militant groups to the U.S. terrorist list and take action against those that provide assistance to these groups. No nation can continue to support terrorism without triggering strong action by the US. If Pakistan is not with us on this, then I will conclude they are against us.

Question 4: Given its size and strategic importance, many have argued that India deserves to have a permanent seat in the Security Council. As President, would you support India’s case?

Gen. Clark:
No response

Gov. Dean:
I believe that in keeping with India’s importance in the world and its prominent role in the United Nations, and in preserving international peace and security, India should have a leadership role in the United Nations. But this question raises larger issues about overall inclusion, participation, and representation in the United Nations Security Council. These issues must be dealt with in a comprehensive manner, taking into consideration the unique roles that nations play in the international community. This is not a matter to be decided by the U.S. alone, and as President, I look forward to engaging in this dialogue with the other permanent members of the United Nations Security Council and India.

Sen. Kerry:
I am interested in looking at ways to make the Security Council more effective and more representative of today’s international community. While I think that in many ways India would be a good candidate for Security Council membership, there is one notable problem: India is not a party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). All the nuclear powers on the Council not only directly shape the NPT, but also are parties that abide by it. This may be the most serious issue with respect to India’s candidacy for Council membership and one that must be addressed by India.

Rep. Kucinich:
Absolutely. As the world’s largest democracy, India is an important voice in the United Nations. A permanent seat would allow India to play a stronger role in crucial decision-making processes. This would be a great benefit to the world community because India has consistently promoted peaceful means of resolving matters of international concern. Furthermore, the strength and credibility of the UN is bolstered as more nations are invited to share the responsibilities of the permanent members of the Security Council.

Sen. Lieberman:
I believe India has an important role to play in global issues. It is time for us to review and expand the permanent membership of the UN Security Council. If we can accomplish this, India should be one of the new permanent members.

Question 5: The Patriot Act gives sweeping new powers of detention and surveillance to the Executive branch of government and law enforcement agencies, and deprives the government of judicial oversight to ensure that these law enforcement powers are not being abused. Indian Americans and other minority communities feel particularly vulnerable to the abuses of the Patriot Act. What is your opinion on this issue? As President, would you repeal provisions of the Patriot Act that have seriously undermined the civil liberties of American citizens and non-citizens?

Gen. Clark:
Too many people have been hurt by the PATRIOT Act, especially those of South Asian, Arab, Muslim or Sheik origin. We need to review the Patriot Act and set up a system in which racial profiling and discriminatory behavior is not tolerated. John Ashcroft has implemented the Patriot Act in a radical and unfair way. The Attorney General has a responsibility to all Americans to uphold the principles of democracy and all that this country stands for. He has not lived up to his responsibility. As president, I will protect the civil liberties of all Americans.

Gov. Dean:
As President, I will devote myself to protecting Americans from terrorism. However, as we fight the war on terror, we must be vigilant in protecting civil rights and freedoms. The rule of law and due process must continue to be the hallmarks of our judicial system. There is no contradiction between protecting the country from terrorism and ensuring the protection of our basic freedoms every step of the way. This Administration has unnecessarily compromised our freedoms in the name of fighting terrorism. While its overzealousness diminishes the rights of all Americans, it has taken its greatest toll on communities whose cooperation we need in the fight against terror. Policies that single out immigrants for special registration procedures and coercive interviews amount to ethnic and religious profiling. These tactics antagonize minority communities without enhancing security. The detention of thousands in secretive federal custody for weeks and months, sometimes without formal charges, is also unacceptable. And recently the Justice Department’s Inspector General identified credible allegations that detainees have suffered physical abuse in custody. I am deeply troubled by some provisions in the USA Patriot Act, which was enacted in the wake of 9/11 without meaningful debate. The Act gives overly broad investigative and surveillance powers to the government and strips federal courts of their traditional authority to curb abuses of power by the executive branch. Now the Attorney General is seeking to supplement the Patriot Act with Patriot Act II, included in the Administration’s so-called “Victory Act” proposal. Rather than expanding the Patriot Act, we should reconsider the wisdom of the original bill.

Sen. Kerry:
We need to scale back several provisions in the Patriot Act to assure our enhanced security does not come at the expense of our civil liberties. First, I think we need to limit the use of "sneak and peek" search warrants that allow searches to occur without notifying the subject and without any judicial oversight. We need strong oversight to assure the authority can only be used in cases where it is absolutely necessary. We also need to stop unchecked roving wiretaps. I will require law enforcement to identify the place or the target to be wiretapped and require that surveillance be conducted only when the presence of the target is ascertained. And we need to ensure that library and business records are obtained only when a judicial warrant is served.

Rep. Kucinich:
I am the only presidential candidate who voted against the PATRIOT Act. I believe that this law grants the federal government powers which are both exorbitant and unconstitutional. Along with 20 other members of Congress, I have introduced the Benjamin Franklin True Patriot Act, which would repeal several major sections of the law. It would eliminate the PATRIOT Act's subjective search-and-seizure provision, unwarranted incarcerations, and the authority of federal officials to search our private records without probable cause. The act would restore the fundamental right of attorney-client privilege, revoke various Department of Justice secrecy orders, and repeal provisions harmful to the rights of immigrants. In addition, it would restore transparency to Department of Justice and Department of Homeland Security administrative procedures by revoking Freedom of Information Act secrecy orders.

Sen. Lieberman:
I am exceedingly concerned by the allegations of civil liberty abuses by this Administration, whether under the Patriot Act or otherwise. I voted for the Patriot Act – because I believe that, in a post-September 11 world, we need to make sure that law enforcement has the tools it needs to fight the war on terrorism. But what this Administration has done since then tells me that they just don't have the necessary respect for our nation's foundational commitment to civil liberties. The Ashcroft Justice Department's own Inspector General tells us that in the wake of September 11, the Department abused the rights of hundreds of foreign nationals they encountered during their investigation. The Administration must do better, and as President, I certainly will. As for the Patriot Act, fortunately, the Democratic leadership insisted that many of the Patriot Act's provisions be temporary. We need to insist that the Administration share with us and the public how it’s used those provisions, and before we even think of reauthorizing them, we need to hear the Administration's response to the abuse allegations and have them justify why they should be trusted with these authorities in the future.

Question 6: Post 9/11, there has been an increase in hate crimes towards Indian Americans and other minorities. As President, what would you do to reduce the incidence of such crimes?

Gen. Clark:
Hate crimes of any sort are unacceptable. As President, I will strengthen federal protections against hate crimes and fight for the civil rights of all Americans. I support legislation to increase the federal government’s role in preventing, investigating and prosecuting hate crimes. No one in this country should be the target of violence because of their race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.

Gov. Dean:
Crimes motivated by the victim’s race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and so on, are an affront to the core America values of tolerance and inclusion. As President, I will direct my Attorney General to vigorously prosecute federal hate crimes. In addition, I support enactment of the Local Law Enforcement Enhancement Act to help states investigate and prosecute bias crimes. More generally, my administration will promote respect and understanding of different cultures and religions in American society, which is the best way to prevent hate crimes from occurring.

Sen. Kerry:
I am an original cosponsor of Federal hate crimes legislation which would criminalize serious offenses committed against individuals because of, among other things, their religious or ethnic affiliations. While most state and local police and prosecutors are vigilant in investigating and prosecuting hate crimes, we need a backup system to assure that every hate crime is properly vindicated. As President, I would assure that the Hate Crimes Act was properly enforced by the Justice Department and that there were appropriate resources for the training of state and local officials in identifying, solving and prosecuting these crimes at a state level.

Rep. Kucinich:
I believe that fear is the root of hatred. As president, one of my highest priorities will be to move America away from policies that generate unnecessary fears. Toward this end, I would reject the Bush administration policy of dealing with terrorism with preemptive war. It is much more constructive to view terrorism as an international criminal problem to be addressed by through the United Nations. Strong institutions of international law also promote the ideal of diverse ethnic and religious groups sharing universal values, which is an effective way to overcome the fear which can lead to hate crimes. In addition, the high-profile nature of the presidency will provide me with many opportunities to encourage Americans to unite behind the ideal of freedom under the rule of law, rather than remain divided by race or religion.

Sen. Lieberman:
I am a longtime cosponsor of the leading anti-hate crimes bill. As President, I will fight for enactment of that proposal and ensure that the Justice Department provides devotes significant energy to helping to prevent such hate crimes from happening in the first place and ensuring that those who commit them are appropriately prosecuted and punished.

Question 7: As a growing community, which has many accomplishments, the Indian Americans feel grossly underrepresented in all branches of the government. Would role do you envisage for Indian Americans in your administration? Would you seek them out for senior positions?

Gen. Clark:
We cannot have a great nation without the leadership of our very best – of all backgrounds. A commitment to diversity ensures that future leaders who might otherwise never get a chance are brought to the forefront. That’s why Americans – all Americans – benefit from the contributions of Indian Americans. I am a strong believer in the principles of Affirmative Action, and as President, I will make sure that my Cabinet truly reflects America.

Gov. Dean:
One of the things I admired about Bill Clinton is that he said he would build an administration that looks like America - and he did. But we can do even more. It's not enough for an administration to look like America. The real measure of progress is whether an administration genuinely represents and reflects our nation's wealth of diversity. Not only will I appoint Indian Americans to my administration, but all my appointees - whether they are African American or Hispanic – Gujarati or Tamil - all will be men and women of conscience, talented individuals who will appreciate the immense diversity of your communities, who will understand your needs and interests, and who will give a voice to all Americans.

Sen. Kerry:
Indian Americans have made extraordinary contributions to all aspects of American society. It is long past time that Indian Americans be fully represented in the government. As President, I will make every effort to involve Indian Americans at the highest levels of my administration.

Rep. Kucinich:
I have a great deal of respect for the people of India, and Indian American citizens as well. I would not hesitate to consider qualified Indian American applicants for any position in my administration. As president, I would work to strengthen India’s role as a member of the United Nations, and promote bilateral trade conditioned on worker’s rights, human rights, and environmental protections. Toward these goals, Indian Americans would be a welcome addition to a Kucinich administration.

Sen. Lieberman:
The Indian-American community has earned great respect through its strong work ethic and family values. We must take advantage of this strength by helping those who have already contributed so much to our economic vitality now become full participants in the political life of our nation as well. It’s time for Indian-Americans to be more fully represented among the nation’s political leadership. If elected, I will aggressively find that talent and place it in senior positions in my administration.

Question 8: Do you have any message for the Indian American community in the United States?

Gen. Clark:
The relationship between the U.S and India is rooted in our common democratic ideals-- and it grows stronger everyday. As president, I will be committed to addressing the wide range of issues important to the Indian-American community. It is now less than a year before the American people will elect the next President of the United States. I have faith that the majority of Americans will stand up for civil liberties, a vibrant economy, and global security. Our country cannot endure the effects of the Bush administration for four more years. We must ensure that the greatest number of voters possible participates in the upcoming primaries and in the general election in November 2004. If elected, I know that I will be able to put this country back on the right track for all Americans. I ask for your support in achieving our common goals. Together, we can revive the America of three years ago—one that values prosperity, progress and tolerance. I look forward to working with each of you to achieve this.

Gov. Dean:
I am running for President to restore the ideal of the American community. Whether you define community by geography, ethnicity, religion, or shared experience, our democracy is built on a foundation of mutual respect and equal opportunity for all our diverse populations. For more than forty years, Indian American immigrants have made valuable contributions to our society. From the engineers and doctors of the 1960s and 1970s to the hospitality industry and high tech workers of the 1980s and 1990s – Indian Americans have helped to change the landscape of America for the better. Now is the time for the immigrant generation and the rapidly growing second generation to demonstrate their political might. I hope we will remain engaged in a dialogue on these and many other issues over the course of my Presidential campaign. I encourage you to learn more about my candidacy at www.DeanForAmerica.com and www.aapifordean.com.
Jai Hind!

Sen. Kerry:
I am delighted to have this opportunity to share my views and my vision with the Indian-American community. The importance of this election cannot be overstated. George Bush has taken our country down the wrong path in nearly every conceivable way. In my first 100 days as President, I will “End the Era of Ashcroft” and restore individual liberty and freedoms while protecting America against terrorists. I will repeal every single act George Bush has taken to rollback environmental protections. I will send a health care plan to Congress that stops spiraling costs, covers every child in America, and makes it possible for every American to get the same health care as any Member of Congress. And I will end President Bush’s flawed policy of unilateralism and rejoin the community of nations. As President, I will make America safer, stronger and more prosperous. I will nurture the important relationship between the United States and India and ensure that the rights of Indian-Americans are protected here at home. I would be deeply honored to have your support.

Rep. Kucinich:
This upcoming presidential election is a historical crossroads. America is heading down a dangerous road into the 21st century. The Bush administration is working overtime to reduce environmental protections, weaken international law, and erode our most precious civil liberties. This is the moment to steer away from these destructive policies, and rejoin the global community in working towards solutions to the challenges of the coming century. A strong United Nations is a necessary condition for lasting world peace. Institutions of international law provide a basis for the non-violent resolution of conflict. A Kucinich Administration would work to strengthen the United Nations by abandoning the misguided policies of unilateralism and preemption. The United States must also affirm principles of sustainability as well as recognize and promote international cooperation and agreements. Furthermore, I propose to establish a cabinet-level Department of Peace, seeking nothing less than the transformation of our society, to make non-violence an organizing principle, to make war archaic through creating a paradigm shift in our culture for human development for economic and political justice and for violence control. The primary goals of this department would be to support disarmament, treaties, peaceful coexistence and peaceful consensus building. Its focus on economic and political justice will examine and enhance resource distribution, human and economic rights and strengthen democratic values. Violence is not inevitable. War is not inevitable. Nonviolence and peace are inevitable. We can make of this world a gift of peace which will confirm the presence of universal spirit in our lives. We can send into the future the gift which will protect our children from fear, from harm, from destruction.

Sen. Lieberman:
Indian Americans embody the values of responsibility, community, and opportunity that make our country great. They have proven that, in America, if you work hard, play by the rules, give a little back to your community, and invest in the education of yourselves and your children, there is no limit to what you can achieve. I will continue to work hard during this campaign to earn the support of the Indian American community. As I have said, Al Gore's decision to select me as his running mate in 2000 broke a barrier in American political life. And I hope that we were able to knock down barriers for every ethnic minority group in this great country, including for Indian Americans. I’m running for President because I love America—and hate the direction George W. Bush is taking us. But we’re not going to defeat his extreme agenda with extreme anger. We’ve got to bring the country together and move it forward, by offering new ideas. By fighting for what’s right—whether or not it’s politically popular. George W. Bush gave away the store to big corporations. I’m going to cut taxes for 98 percent of taxpayers and make the most fortunate pay their fair share. George W. Bush pays lip service to helping families. I’ll make sure you can take care of a newborn baby or sick family member without losing your whole paycheck. We’ve got to unify around common goals and values – with a positive, hopeful message. That’s what I’m offering in this campaign—and what I’ll offer as President of the United States.

Question 9: How can the Indian American community get involved with you campaign? Who do we contact for this purpose?

Gen. Clark:
To become more involved in my campaign, visit my website at www.clark04.com. Across the nation and globe, Clark supporters meet up and discuss the campaign. All the information regarding Meet Ups and other ways you can help and become involved are listed on my website. I also encourage you to sign up on line to our newsletter. This way, you'll be updated on all events and news pertaining to the campaign. I appreciate all the support, and am sincerely grateful for the Indian American community's involvement in my campaign.

Gov. Dean:
My campaign is built on a very simple premise: people, not politicians, are the key to changing our country. That is why I have worked to build the largest grassroots campaign in the history of modern politics. The key to this grassroots movement is engaging people who have, for too long, been left out of the process or chosen to remain uninvolved. To-date, almost 550,000 people have already joined my campaign to take back our country – and we are doing even more. In the coming weeks, grassroots volunteers will be launching Desis for Dean – a network of Indian American supporters who are organizing voter outreach, fundraising, volunteer activities, and more, specifically for the Indian American communities. For more information about opportunities to get involved with my campaign, please contact: Parag V. Mehta, Political Staff, Dean for America – National HQ 802-651-3200 [p] 802-651-3299 [f] parag@deanforamerica.com or Steve Gerencser, NH Deputy Political Director, Dean for America – New Hampshire 603-222-1900 [p] 603-222-8996 [f] sgerencser@deanforamerica.com

Sen. Kerry:
To learn more about my campaign and to get involved, please visit www.JohnKerry.com and call Theo Yedinsky in my New Hampshire campaign office at (603) 622-9100

Rep. Kucinich:
One of the most important ways to help this campaign is to spread the word. Write letters to local media. Tell family, friends, and neighbors about the campaign. There are also many opportunities to volunteer, including internships. This is a great way to get more directly involved in the political process. For details, call 1-866-413-3664, or check out www.kucinich.us.

Sen. Lieberman:
A presidential campaign is a team effort – and I need your help to spread our campaign’s message of strength, growth, and opportunity for all. Whether it's hosting a house party, helping distribute literature door-to-door, or attending a rally, there are countless ways to help. Here's how you can get more involved. Contact: Chris Lavery, Joe Lieberman for President, 1195 Elm Street, Manchester, NH 03101, Phone (603) 669-2004, Fax (603) 644-4563. Or go to my website: www.joe2004.com



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